(800) 869-8643

admin@hayesbrokers.com

Insuring Firearms in Your Home

Insuring Firearms in Your Home

If you are one of the millions of homeowners who own a firearm (or several), you have special insurance concerns. While in the majority of cases it is illegal to own and store firearms in your home, how should they be insured? Property Coverage On a standard homeowners’ special form policy (HO3 or equivalent) firearms are discussed under Section I – Property Coverages. There under “3. Special Limits of Liability” is this notation: Firearms will be covered under the property portion of the policy, but only up to $2,500 and only for the peril of theft. It is important to note that this is a sub-limit and does not increase your policy limits. So if you have $100,000 in contents coverage, the $2,500 firearms limit will be included in that amount, not in addition to it. Should your firearms collection (including related equipment) be worth more than $2,500, you will need to discuss higher limits of coverage with your broker that would be in addition to your policy limit. This endorsement may also extend coverage to firearms for perils other than just theft. Liability Coverage The issue of liability insurance coverage for firearms is a bit more tricky. While the policy itself usually doesn’t specifically include firearms, it doesn’t exclude them, either. However, specific policy language does include or exclude coverage based on the circumstances. Here is what the policy says about Personal Liability: Based on this wording, if a shooting occurs in your home or on your property it would be covered, right? Well, it depends on the circumstances. The first thing to note is who is an...
Insurance for Ax-Throwing Businesses

Insurance for Ax-Throwing Businesses

First, it was rage rooms, and now ax-throwing is the next big thing in relaxation techniques. As these businesses continue to pop up across the country, you may be wondering: where can I get insurance for that? We have the answer: Hayes Brokers. What kind of insurance do you need for an ax-throwing business? It may be similar to more mainstream businesses, but with a twist. Liability Insurance Every business needs liability insurance. This insurance covers everything from slips and falls to property damage caused by your business on your business premises. It covers you for any unintended negligence on the part of your business (such as a fall due to a wet spill) and will even protect you in the event you are sued for something that wasn’t your fault. Additional insured coverage can be added for your landlord, which will be required for any business that leases space from another company. Your landlord or property management company will require this when you sign the lease. Property Insurance While ax-throwing businesses will take every precaution to protect the building and adjacent property from damage, property insurance is still an important part of your insurance portfolio. Property owned by the business, including copiers, wall art, computers, and phone systems should be insured under a property insurance policy. Under a commercial property policy, there would be coverage for fire, theft and other property hazards not necessarily associated with ax-throwing. If you are a tenant, you should also consider tenants improvements and betterments coverage. This covers your business for any special build-outs that may be required for your business to function...
Your Guide to Property Claims

Your Guide to Property Claims

We hope it never happens to you, but property claims do happen. Whether it is a break-in, a tornado, or a fire, we’ve got you covered.  If it’s your first claim, you may not know what to do. Luckily your policy gives you a good idea of what your next steps should be, in a section usually titled “Duties In The Event Of Loss Or Damage”. First Things First The first question you need to ask yourself is: “Was a law broken?”  If so, you should immediately contact the police. Whether this was a burglary or a robbery, the police should always be the first call. If no law has been broken, you can move on to the next step. Timing Is Everything As per the Building and Personal Property Coverage Form (CP 00 10): Property damage may be compounded over time due to weather and other factors, so reporting damage in a timely fashion is important. As soon as you are aware of loss or damage to your building or contents, you should notify your broker or your insurance company. The company will need a description of the damage, including how and when it occurred to be sure that the damaged property is covered under your policy. Failure to report property damage or loss in a timely manner could result in reduced claim payments. Then What? Once you have reported the damage or loss to the insurance company, your duties are still not over. The policy states that upon reporting you must: You must protect the property from further damage or loss. Be sure to keep records of...
“Alarming” Things About Insurance

“Alarming” Things About Insurance

If you have property insurance (and you should) the application may have asked about your security measures. Do you have armed guards? Do you have a sprinkler system? Do you have a burglar alarm system? In some cases your security measures may earn you a discount on your policy premium. However, they probably also include something else: a Protective Safeguards endorsement. What is that, and could it be a problem? Protective Safeguards Endorsement The Protective Safeguards endorsement will look something like this: The premises and building numbers will correspond with the location(s) scheduled on the declarations page of the policy, and each one will have one or more symbols listed next to it, each starting with “P-”. P-1 is an Automatic Sprinkler System P-2 is an Automatic Fire Alarm P-3 is a Security Service that makes hourly rounds P-4 is a Service Contract with a privately owned fire department P-5 is an Automatic Commercial Cooking Exhaust and Extinguishing System P-9 is any other protective system shown and described in the schedule Why List Protective Systems? If you list a protective system on your application, you will most likely receive a discount on your coverage. However, the insurance company will require that the protective system be in complete working order at the time of a loss, otherwise they will not pay on the claim. The endorsement itself includes a provision adding an exclusion to the policy that says if the policyholder knows that the protective system was not working prior to the loss, then there is no coverage. If the protective system fails because it was not properly maintained, there...
Insurance for College Students

Insurance for College Students

It seems just like yesterday your little pumpkin was born, but now he or she is off to college. You pack up his or her belongings, drive the child off to the dorm (or apartment), drop him or her off, and breath a sigh of relief. Will he get enough sleep? Will she get enough to eat? Will he make the football team? Will she get the grades she needs to get into law school? All of these are normal worries. Something else you should be worrying about: is your kid (and his or her belongings) covered while he or she is at university? Now THAT is a good question. Let’s find out more about insurance for college students. Dorm Life vs. Off-Campus Life While Tommy or Jill is living at the dorm or off-campus in an apartment, are their belongings covered? The answer: it depends. If your student lives in the dorms on campus and is registered as a full- or part-time college student, their belongings may be covered by your homeowners’ insurance policy. Typically the amount of coverage will be 10% of the contents limit on your homeowners’ insurance policy. For example, if your contents limit if $50,000, then the limit for your student will be $5,000. Will this cover all of his belongings? If he has an expensive computer or other electronics equipment, you may want to consider increasing your contents limit at home or talking to your broker about special coverage for these items. There may also be an age limit for this coverage, usually age 25 or 26. If you have a college student...