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What Flood Insurance Doesn’t Cover

What Flood Insurance Doesn’t Cover

As most everyone knows, flood insurance is not covered by the typical homeowners or business insurance property policy. The solution for getting flood insurance is usually to obtain a policy through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). NFIP attempted to fill a significant gap in coverage for property owners when property insurance carriers began to exclude flood coverage. Unfortunately, NFIP doesn’t cover everything. It Doesn’t Cover All Flooding NFIP has a specific defintion of a flood. It is as follows: A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of two or more acres of normally dry land area or of two or more properties (one of which is your property) from: a. Overflow of inland or tidal waters b. Unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source c. Mudflow. Per this definition, if your bathtub or toilet overflows and makes a mess of your house, there is no coverage under your flood insurance policy. If your washing machine floods the garage while you’re out running errands there is no coverage. This type of water damage may be covered under your homeowners policy, but it depends on the type of damage and how it occurred. Talk to your broker about what types of water damage may be covered by your policy. It Doesn’t Cover Everything You Own The NFIP policies do limit the amount of coverage you can purchase for your home or business. These limits are as follows: TypeBuilding LimitContents LimitOne to Four Family Residential$250,000$100,000Other Residential (Non-Condo)$500,000$100,000Non-Residential Business$500,000$500,000 It is important to note that if the replacement cost of the structure is less...
Why Is Flood Insurance So Expensive?

Why Is Flood Insurance So Expensive?

Whether it is your first time purchasing home or business flood insurance, or your renewal just came in the mail, you’re sure to have sticker shock. How can one policy covering one peril be so expensive? There are a few reasons why, and there are some things you can do about it. Location, Location, Location If you own property in a flood-prone area, your rates will be higher than in areas not prone to flooding. This can mean you are located near a water source such as a lake or river, or it could mean that you live in an area susceptible to run off or dam failure. Your flood zone is the largest determining factor in your premium. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) defines flood zones as Special Hazard Flood Area (SFHA – zones starting with A or V), moderate hazard flood area (zones starting with B and X zones that appear shaded on the FEMA map), and minimal flood hazard areas (zone C or unshaded zone X). What can you do? Short of moving, you can check your flood zone to be sure what is on your policy is correct. FEMA is constantly revising maps in all areas. You can check your flood zone in the FEMA Flood Map Service Center. Bear in mind that the flood map link above won’t be enough to change your policy – you will need either a Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) from FEMA or have your elevation certificate updated by a licensed surveyor. The rate change most likely won’t be retroactive, but it would affect your upcoming flood policy...
Hayes Speaks at El Sobrante Rotary Meeting

Hayes Speaks at El Sobrante Rotary Meeting

Galen Hayes was honored to speak (in costume, this is NOT his normal look) at the monthly meeting of The Rotary Club of El Sobrante – District 5160 on October 31, 2017. Galen spoke on a few of his favorite topics with regard to insurance, including flood insurance, earthquake insurance and fire insurance for homeowners. Flood insurance has been a hot topic this year due to flooding from the recent hurricanes, as well as inclement weather across the country. Recent hurricane losses in Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico are in the hundreds of billions of dollars, though much of it is either uninsured or underinsured. The topic of earthquake insurance touched on the California Earthquake Authority and the lack of insured homes for this coverage.   Fire and homeowners insurance were also discussed, including proper insurance valuation and the possibility that many homes are uninsured.It is estimated that in the recent Napa fires nearly 30% of the 9,000 homes burned were not insured. Galen Hayes is available to speak on a wide variety of insurance topics for both homeowners and business owners. If your organization is looking for an entertaining and knowledgeable speaker, call our office to book Mr. Hayes for your next meeting....
Three Reasons NOT to Buy Flood Insurance

Three Reasons NOT to Buy Flood Insurance

With all of the horrifying pictures in the news of flooded cities around the country, you might be thinking about flood insurance.  If you have it, do you have enough?  If you don’t have it should you purchase it? Your insurance broker may have tried to sell you a flood insurance policy in the past, but you had a good reason to decline the coverage. After all, who wants to pay for something you don’t really need? That’s probably what all of those businesses in Houston thought, too. Here are some (not so) good excuses for declining to purchase flood insurance. Your Bank Doesn’t Require It Maybe you don’t have a mortgage on your property. Or perhaps, because of location, you aren’t required to have flood insurance to secure or maintain your mortgage. Does that mean you shouldn’t purchase the coverage? While bank flood requirements account for a large portion of flood insurance policies sales, even those without mortgages or those who are not required to purchase coverage should still consider flood insurance policies.  Why?  Because even properties where flood insurance isn’t required are still subject to flooding. If you are in a flood plain (or even if you aren’t) floods may still occur and you could be affected. Your Bank Purchased Flood Coverage “For You” Bank provided insurance (often called force-placed insurance) is when the bank either offers to insure your property or forces the coverage on you because you have failed to provide your own. Some may find this option more convenient than shopping for your own policy, but be warned: force-placed coverage does not benefit you...
Flood Insurance for Businesses

Flood Insurance for Businesses

Flood insurance is more important now than ever. Flood events across the country in the last few years are affecting not only homeowners, but also businesses. In August 2016, Louisiana experienced flooding that cost over $3.8 billion in losses. Included in that figure were over 6,000 businesses, many uninsured. What many business owners don’t know is that flood is not a covered peril under your business package insurance policy. It also cannot be included in these policies. Flood insurance is always a separate policy, but it can be purchased in different ways. Here is what you need to know about flood insurance for businesses: Basic Flood Insurance The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) offers basic flood insurance limits for businesses. Because this is a government program, coverage is limited to: $500,000 or replacement cost value per structure at any one location, whichever is less. $500,000 or replacement cost value in contents coverage per structure at any one location, whichever is less. In addition, policies are limited to one structure per policy.  Even if your building is worth more than $500,000, the limit may not exceed $500,000. Underwriting requirements include a flood elevation certificate, two pictures of the structure front and back and payment in full of the policy premium. Unless the insurance is for a loan closing, there is typically a 30-day waiting period before the policy goes into effect. Private Market Insurance While NFIP used to be the only game in town, this is no longer the case. There are private insurers available to insure businesses for the peril of flood. The good news is that these insurers...